YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Momofuku’s Soy-Sauce-Soaked Eggs

This recipe is in honor of our seventeen lovely new chicks, who arrived in November and moved out to the big-girl coop this past weekend to join the gold-laced Wyandottes who’ve been with us for about three years now. The little girls won’t be laying for a little while yet, but their pale pink combs are starting to color and fill out! Once they begin to lay, we’ll have dozens and dozens of eggs!

Every once in a while you come across an amazing, new recipe, something you’ve never heard of before but which sounds extraordinarily wonderful. This is one of those recipes, and you can thank the wonderful food blog, food52, for a prior version of this recipe.

To quote the author, “What I like best is that these eggs can be used in a thousand different ways: They are perfect for breakfast, for a midafternoon snack, sliced onto an English muffin or a plate of arugula, and more.”

To quote me, “Oh come on, you know you’re just gonna open that jar, slip out a gorgeous egg, and nibble it right down to your fingers!” Yes, I know this recipe has sugar, but I didn’t want to substitute honey in case it affects its 4-week refrigerator life. If, on the other hand, you plan to eat them all within a few days, then go ahead and try it with the substitution.

6 large eggs
6 tbsp. warm water
1 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. sherry vinegar
3/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce

In a medium bowl, whisk the sugar into the water until completely dissolved. Stir in the sherry vinegar and tamari.

Set a large pot of water up to boil. Carefully lower the eggs into the pot, and cook for exactly 6 minutes and 50 seconds, stirring slowly for the first 90 seconds to distribute the heat evenly.

Meanwhile, prepare a large bowl with cold water and ice. At the end of the cooking time, transfer the eggs as quickly as possible into the ice bath. Once they are cool, peel them under the water. This should help to keep the outsides perfectly smooth.

Place the eggs in a bowl or jar filled with the soy sauce, and marinate in the refrigerator for 2 to 6 hours. To make sure the eggs remain completely submerged, you may need to cover the bowl with a small plate if necessary. Remove the eggs from the marinade, and serve.

Two interesting facts: #1 As long as you keep them refrigerated in a tightly sealed container, the eggs will keep for up to 4 weeks. #2 You can save the soy sauce for a second batch of eggs.

To serve, cut the eggs in half lengthwise and season lightly with fresh black pepper. Bon appetit!


YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Cookies!

I hope that everyone is having a wonderful holiday, and that you find yourself surrounded by at least a few simple things to nourish body and soul, like kind people, blankets, hummable music and, of course, good food. Just in case you’re looking for one more cookie recipe, I recommend this one. Enjoy to your heart’s content. Continue reading


YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Huevos Haminados (Slow-roasted Eggs)

Haminados are one of my all-time favorite Passover recipes! Simple, sublime and delicious, they have been a staple at the Passover tables of Mediterranean Jewish communities for millennia! Check out this recipe and you’ll see why. Whether you make this dish in your crockpot or oven, it takes just a few minutes to toss it together and get it cooking. Continue reading


YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Red Cabbage Salad With A Buzz

It’s a red-green party, lunch for a week with spicy, crunchy, sour power! Make some for you, or your gang, or your office potluck! When I saw this recipe I knew it was for me. Generally speaking, cabbage is one of those foods that is very underrated — especially the red kind. Continue reading


YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Muffin-y Goodness

Of course, this is an especially good week for an egg recipe…

My sister saw a recipe for these beauties last week, and now you should try them! I love the idea of eating a few for breakfast, taking some for lunch, popping one or two for a mid-afternoon snack, and then making a whole new batch. But maybe not all on the same day.

My advice? Use eggs with the brightest orange-yellow yolks, berries with deepest warmest color, and the sweetest, ripest bananas you can find. You can’t possibly go wrong! Continue reading


YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Black Bean Brownies

Definitely on a roll here with desserts (especially brownies)! It happens.

I am a huge fan of black-bean brownies. I owe this to two facts: First, I am a big fan of beans. And secondly, I love brownies. So there you have it. In case you are wondering, the beans in this recipe cannot be tasted at all, so feel free to make this for children and skeptics. They will NEVER know, unless you tell. Continue reading


YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Brownies To Crow About

If you are trying to figure out what to bring to the Memorial Day Picnic that’s coming up, you may want to give some consideration to putting these amazing brownies on the menu. In fact, you’ll probably want to do a dry run and make a practice batch beforehand, just to make sure they come out the way you’re hoping. Yes, that’s probably what you’ll want to do! Continue reading



YOUR HEALTHY PLATE: Scrambled Eggs and Broccoli

After the requisite amount of hemming and hawwing, I picked up a copy of Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything as a shower gift for our young cousin and his beaming Australian bride-to-be. When they opened it, he quipped “Well, we won’t be needing any other cookbooks.” True dat! Try this broccoli beauty for starters. Or dinner. Continue reading


Scoop at the Coop, Spring 2014

After a brutal winter with long weeks of short days, and single-digit temperatures, the hens are once again out and about, chowing down on the grass and sucking up all the worms. They’re racing across the lawn and along the edge of the woods, enjoying the freedom to spread their wings and wiggle their tail feathers with abandon.

The girls are laying eggs again after months of little or no activity, and these eggs are spectacular. The yolks sit tall and proud above the clear, compact whites, and they are so deep yellow that probably no one would challenge you if you chose to call them orange. That gorgeous orange-yellow color comes from all the polyphenols and beta-carotene (a precursor of Vitamin A) in the grass that they are eating with relish. I think they really missed the bugs, worms, and grass. Laying mash can get very boring, the equivalent, in my mind, of living on oatmeal or shredded wheat for months at a time.

Continue reading